Women empowerment in India

Women empowerment in India

Women empowerment in India

In the 70’s the government came up with the idea of welfare of women which in the 80’s was changed to “development and the year 2001 was declared as Women empowerment in India.

The most common explanation of women’s empowerment’ is the ability to exercise full control over one’s actions The last decades have witnessed some basic changes in the status and role of women in our society. Today women are becoming increasingly self-conscious of their discrimination in several areas of family and public life.

They are also in a position to mobilize themselves on issues that can affect their overall position. But has anything much changed in the last 63 years? The recent spate attack on women shows that there has been a lot of discrepancy between the policies declared and those that are executed. Women empowerment in India Forget about woman empowerment, they are not even safe in our homes or outside.  Women still depend on men’s mercy for their survival. This happens in a country where the majority of the Indians (52%) are women.

Women empowerment in India

Women empowerment would become more relevant only if women are educated, better informed and can take rational decisions. It should make them strong, alert and aware of their equal status in the society.

Unless their voice is heard in the Parliament or the State Assemblies their empowerment will be confined to the announcement of some piecemeal policies by the male dominated society.

The Women’s reservation policy bill is however a very sad story as it is repeatedly being scuttled in parliament. In the Panchayati Raj system, however, women have been given representation as a sign of political empowerment. There are many elected women representatives at the village council level.

However their power is restricted, as is often the case men wield all the authority from behind. Their decisions are often over-ruled by the government machinery. It is crucial to train and give real power to these women leaders so that they can catalyst change in their villages regarding women. All this shows that the process of gender equality and women’s empowerment still has a long way to go and may even have become more difficult in the recent years.

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